Julie Weiss Completes 52 Marathons!

Julie Weiss is the Energizer Bunny of marathon runners. For 52 weeks, she kept on going and going and going.
On Sunday, she finally stopped. As she crossed the finish line of the Los Angeles Marathon, she reached her goal of running a marathon every week for a year to raise awareness for the disease that killed her father.

“Pancreatic cancer is my only competition out there and I intend to beat it,” she told TODAY.
The 42-year-old California mother of two started her year-long journey after her father passed away in November 2010, only a month after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. The experience stunned her.
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“People don’t know what we’re dealing with here,” she said. “It’s almost like a death sentence.”
She started her mission with a marathon in Rome and followed with a race every weekend throughout the United States and Canada. She would work her 9-to-5 job during the week and then immediately hop on a plane. She finished each race with a huge smile and arms raised — and then head back home Sunday.
“We have never had anybody do what Julie Weiss has done,” said Pam Marquardt, founder of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network.

Weiss and her dad, who died a month after his diagnosis.
So far, Weiss has raised $177, 378 for the charity, according to her website www.MarathonGoddess.com, a play off the nickname she’s been dubbed by fans.
David Levine, her fiancé, acknowledged it has been a hard journey.
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“Psychologically, it was taxing, difficult, tiring,” he said.

Completing 52 marathons in 52 weeks means that Weiss has run 1,362.4 miles. That’s roughly the distance between St. Louis to Boston.
Although Weiss runs each race in memory of her father, she dedicates each marathon to a cancer victim.
“In memory of Lydia Jack, she passed at only 52, so Lydia 52 is also for YOU!” she wrote on her blog.

Weiss now plans to take a break, but she said she plans to pick up her race pace again soon. Her next goal is to run another 52 marathons in 52 weeks by 2020 to reach her ultimate goal of raising $1 million dollars for pancreatic cancer research and awareness.

The Doctor is back – and he means business!

Most science fiction enthusiasts had a really long summer, waiting for the eighth season of the revived TV series Doctor Who to hit the screens this August. There was a bit of anxiety mixed into their anticipation, as the Doctor has taken a brand new persona this summer – played by Scottish actor Peter Capaldi, known for his roles in The Thick of It and The Musketeers (he plays Cardinal Richelieu).

The bad news is that the Doctor has changed into a person completely different from his predecessor. If Matt Smith was a Doctor with much humor, clumsiness, energy and fun, Capaldi’s Doctor looks like a much darker, much more serious character. Sometimes he seems to show his age – he is over 1,200 years old by this time. His long age shows in his grey hair and old eyes, too.

This episode had a bit of surprise for real fans – the moment when he left Clara, his long time companion, behind in the (spoilers!) chamber with the dormant clockwork droids. Some were surely shocked by this action – just to be relieved when Clara had put her faith in the Doctor and was not mistaken to do so. I won’t say more, for the sake of those who haven’t had the chance to see the latest episode yet.

All in all, the new Doctor has shown that he means business. After a few clumsy moments in the beginning, with his mind not being “rebooted” yet, he found himself and got things done, showing that he means business. As usual.

Peter Capaldi is the fifth actor to be cast in the title role of the revived Doctor Who TV series (or the fourth, if we don’t count John Hurt’s single episode presence) and the twelfth (thirteenth) actor to be playing the beloved character since the series premiere in 1963. An interesting fact – the Scottish actor was 55 years old when he was cast for his role as the Doctor, the same age as William Hartnell when he was cast as the first Doctor. Capaldi has appeared in the series before – he played Caecilius in a Pompeii-themed episode in season four of the revived series, and John Frobisher in the third season of the spin-off series Torchwood.

Again, the good news: the Doctor is finally back, and he means business. The bad news, in turn, is that we will have to wait a week for the next episode. This is the hardest part – when you finally get a few bits of good stuff, and have to wait patiently for more. I think I’ll play our vast selection of table games each day until the day comes when I get to see some more of the Twelfth Doctor…

Amputee Hits The Right Note

Richard Mangino from Massachusetts suffered from a serious bloodstream infection in 2002 and lost his lower arms and legs. This left him unable to do some of his favorite activities such as drawing, playing piano, and tossing the football around with his grandkids.

In 2011, Mangino underwent a double hand transplant and the surgery was successful. A team of over 40 surgeons, nurses, anesthesiologists, residents, radiologists and physician assistants operated for more than 12 hours to perform his surgery.

His wife told journalists

“One day in July, Mangino told his family, “I’m going to try to swim, go get the    camera,” he recalled. Carole Mangino said she held her breath as he took his strokes. “I said, ‘Oh, my God, he’s going all the way to the end!’ ” Her husband easily swam the length of the pool and then held up his arms in victory.

“It was like watching someone taking his first steps,’’ said Carole, who was so moved she cried. Mangino did drive before the transplant, using a device on the steering wheel his prostheses fit into, enabling him to turn. Playing football with    grandsons Trevor, 6, and Nicholas, 4, is new, and that is when the boys, who had not known their grandfather with his original hands, finally realized the transplant had changed him, Carole said.

Her husband, she said, “is on a cloud,’’ and the bumps in the road have been relatively minor.

Mangino takes medication for nerve pain in his arms, which bothers him especially at night. Pomahac said doctors do not have a good explanation for this type of pain. “The nerves are regrowing, and they not only provide sensations but       provide some random pain stimulus,” he said. “It will eventually go away.’’

Sports Direct Lose out on England Football Flop

England’s laughable and inevitable early exit from the World Cup cost Sports Direct up to £20m in lost profits, the group said, as disappointed football fans failed to buy replica shirts.

Dave Forsey, chief executive, said Roy Hodgson boys’ lacklustre performance was much more significant to the business than a dispute with Adidas which meant Sports Direct could not stock replicas of the on-field strips of key teams, including the winner Germany and runners-up Argentina. The brand has pulled stock from a number of different retailers, because it was unhappy at the presentation of goods or customer service.

“England’s early exit meant a £10m to £20m swing to [underlying profits],” he said. “It’s all about England for the World Cup for our stores. What affects sales primarily will always be how long England lasts in the tournament.”

While Sports Direct revealed a healthy 15.6% rise in pretax profits to £239.5m on sales of £2.7bn, up 23.8% in the year to 27 April, driven by strong sales of sportswear as well as the acquisition of fashion chain Republic, Forsey said performance would have been better if the national team had hit the back of the net more often.

However, Forsey said Sports Direct was hopeful of stocking the key Adidas football strips it wants, including Premier League team Chelsea’s after “encouraging discussions” with the sports brand which stopped supplying certain strips to Sports Direct earlier this year. Forsey was not able to confirm if and when Adidas might begin supply but he said:”Top-level engagement has been encouraging for the last couple of weeks and both teams see opportunities for their side.”

Sports Direct is also seeking a rapprochement with shareholders after a bruising battle over the bonus scheme which would have significantly benefited the chain’s founder, Mike Ashley. On Wednesday, the company said Ashley had chosen to withdraw from the scheme, just two weeks after it had been approved. The move was widely welcomed by major institutional shareholders who felt the bonus arrangements were inappropriately structured.

They want Ashley, who owns a 58% stake in the company but does not receive any pay for his role as executive deputy chairman, to be rewarded by a salary or a dividend that would benefit all investors. Shareholders had threatened to vote against the re-election of the chairman Keith Hellawell and some non-executive directors, but Forsey said their protests had not affected Ashley’s decision.

11 Ways to Overcome Anger

Anger is something that virtually all of us have within us and is something best tackled by ourselves and our own actions.

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Anyway here are 11 ways to calm your anger!

1. Ask: “Am I improving the situation?” This works especially well with the Big Girl. If I get angry with her, she has a complete melt-down. It’s unpleasant, but her reactions have sure helped me get better control of myself. Now, when I have the urge to snap, I think, “Is this going to help the situation?” And the answer is always NO.

2. Find “an area of refuge.” I lifted this phrase from a sign near an elevator at Yale Law School—it struck me as funny. Research shows that when people’s thoughts are unoccupied, brooding sets in. So I try to “find an area of refuge” in my mind; that is, to dwell on serene thoughts instead of brooding and fussing. Along the same lines…

3. Distract myself. Indulging in “overthinking”—dwelling on trifling slights, unpleasant encounters, and sadness—leads to bad feelings. I can enrage myself by obsessing on some petty annoyance. In what the Big Man calls the “downward spiral,” I begin to rail about every negative episode in recent memory. Now I deliberately distract my thoughts, usually by thinking about some writing question.

4. Ask: am I mad at myself? Martha Beck makes the interesting argument that we brood on other people’s faults when we subconsciously identify with them; what we condemn in other people is what we condemn in ourselves. So now when someone is making me angry, I ask myself, “Can I accuse myself of the same fault?” In a telling bit of psychology, I’ve noticed Beck’s observation to be very true for other people, but not so much for myself! Do I suspect a bit of self-denial might be going on…?

5. Laugh. Humor is the answer to everything (humor and exercise). Now when I absolutely can’t hold back my anger, I at least try to insert a joke, or make fun of myself, or assume a lighter tone as I rant on. So instead of sniping out a comment like “Can you PLEASE just answer my emails so I can deal with these horrible logistics issues?!” I might say something like, “I’m thinking of getting a homing pigeon that will fly to your office and rap on your window with its beak until you send me an answer.” The added advantage of this approach is that no matter how the other person responds, I feel less angry and more light-hearted when I adopt a lighter tone.

6. Get some exercise. Physical activity can help reduce stress that can cause you to become angry. If you feel your anger escalating, go for a brisk walk or run, or spend some time doing other enjoyable physical activities.

7. Take a timeout. Timeouts aren’t just for kids. Give yourself short breaks during times of the day that tend to be stressful. A few moments of quiet time might help you feel better prepared to handle what’s ahead without getting irritated or angry.

8. Identify possible solutions. Instead of focusing on what made you mad, work on resolving the issue at hand. Does your child’s messy room drive you crazy? Close the door. Is your partner late for dinner every night? Schedule meals later in the evening — or agree to eat on your own a few times a week. Remind yourself that anger won’t fix anything and might only make it worse.

9. Unplug. Technology encourages us to react quickly. The minute we get that text or feel the phone vibration, we’re racing to respond. Reacting impulsively is a trigger for angry outbursts. Set aside time each day to be free from checking email, social media sites, and text messaging.

10. Train your mind to respond slower. Think, speak, drive, text, listen, cook, eat, and walk slower. When you slow down, you’ll feel more in control of your options and your inner life.

Leave post-it reminders on the computer, your car dashboard, and your front door. Our brains are not trained to remember many things, so write it down.

11. Sleep on it! Honestly, if I had to choose just one option to manage anger, it would be getting sufficient sleep. Sleep deprivation is a huge culprit in negative moods, including anxiety and depression.

Commit to going to bed earlier during the week. It’s nearly impossible to make calm, measured, responsible choices if you can barely keep your eyes open.

Bottom line: You have everything you need to change. With daily commitment, practice, and patience, you’ll increase problem-solving abilities so you can manage your anger, rather than have your anger manage you.

Remember, living in the past causes depression. Living in the future causes anxiety. Living in the here-and-now enables you to make healthy choices to increase emotional well-being.