| Good News Stories from around the World
Sunday November 23rd 2014

Welcome to Good News Stories

Here at Good News Stories we bring you upbeat news stories from around the World.

Rag to close down – Good riddance

The British rag, the News of the World, which is famous for writing sensationalist rubbish for the masses, will be on Sunday producing the last edition of the ‘paper’ News International chairman James Murdoch has said.

In the past few days, claims have been made that the paper authorised hacking into the mobile phone of murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler and the families of 7/7 bombing victims.

Apparently you only need a vocabulary of around 800 words to read the paper. That says it all. Godd riddance to bad rubbish!

 

Austrian man finds treasure!

From Yahoo News:

A man turning dirt in his back yard stumbled onto buried treasure — hundreds of pieces of centuries-old jewelry and other precious objects that Austrian authorities described Friday as a fairy-tale find.

Austria’s department in charge of national antiquities said the trove consists of more than 200 rings, brooches, ornate belt buckles, gold-plated silver plates and other pieces or fragments, many encrusted with pearls, fossilized coral and other ornaments. It says the objects are about 650 years old and are being evaluated for their provenance and worth.

While not assigning a monetary value to the buried bling, the enthusiastic language from the normally staid Federal Office for Memorials reflected the significance it attached to the discovery.

TeloVac could revolutionise cancer treatment

Good news from the world of medical research.

A ”universal” vaccine, which is part of a new generation of drugs that use the body’s own defenses to fight the disease, stopping tumours in their tracks, could be available in just two years.

The TeloVac jab could revolutionise the treatment of cancer.

But it is hoped it will be effective against many other tumours, including those of the skin, lung and liver. Breast and prostate cancers may also be within its grasp.

Rather than attacking the cancer cells, like many existing drugs, it harnesses the power of the immune system to fight the tumours.

If you are travelling abroad make sure you have medical insurance over 80 to ensure you have no expensive bills.

It works by encouraging the immune system to seek out and destroy an enzyme called telomerase. Found at high levels in many cancer cells, telomerase effectively makes them immortal, allowing them to live on when healthy cells would die – easing the growth and spread of the tumour.

More singles finding love through Internet dating

One in three of us in Western Europe and the USA have now visited internet dating websites such as match.com a new international survey has found. This compares to a mere six percent of us back in 1997 when internet dating was young.

The Oxford University online study involved a questionnaire with 12,000 couples from 18 countries.. They were asked a series of questions about whether they had visited internet dating websites, other online services and where else they might go looking for a partner. The questions related to the period up to 2009.

The largest group looking for online love was surprisingly the over 40s which goes against what many people would have thought. The perception is that it’s a young persons thing to date online.

The most lively online nation appears to be Brazil – more than eight of out ten of those interviewed who had access to the internet said they had met someone online. By contrast, in Japan, a country known for embracing technology in so many ways, internet users were rather reluctant to engage with online dating.

Zinc could be the answer to the common cold

People who begin using zinc lozenges, tablets or syrup at the first signs of a common cold are more likely to get well faster, researchers reported Tuesday. But the new findings probably won’t be the last word on the issue, which has been the subject of debate since the idea was first proposed in 1984.

Since that time, 18 studies have examined zinc in preventing or treating colds. Some found zinc supplements were modestly helpful, others failed to turn up any benefits.

One analysis of 14 studies, published in 2007, concluded that many of the studies were too flawed to draw any conclusions.

In the latest report, published by the Cochrane Library, an international network of experts who conduct systematic reviews of research, scientists in India evaluated 15 studies, including four published since 2000.

Two of the studies evaluated focused on zinc’s effectiveness in preventing colds and the rest on its ability to shorten the duration of colds. The 15 studies involved 1,360 participants ranging in age from 1 to 65 with good overall health.

Pooling the data, researchers found that people who took zinc within 24 hours of the start of symptoms were over their colds about one day sooner than people who took placebos. The analysis also found that the severity of cold symptoms was somewhat milder among people who took zin

Virtual reality can ease pain

From BBC News

Burn patients in the United States are being helped to escape the pain of burn injuries by immersing them in the virtual reality of a computer game during treatment.

Agony from severe burns can be one of the most intense and prolonged types of pain you can experience. And for many, the rehabilitation treatment is as painful as the initial burn.

Caleb Springer, aged 23, from Valdez in Alaska suffered second and third degree burns when he was set on fire in a motor bike accident.

Petrol spilled out of his scooter and a stray spark from a cigarette ignited it.

“I was engulfed in flames for probably two minutes. It was the worst pain I’ve ever felt, it was just excruciating. I looked down and just saw skin hanging from my legs,” he said.

His burns were so bad he was airlifted from Alaska to a specialist centre in Seattle where his rehabilitation has been helped by pioneering treatment using a virtual reality computer game.

SnowWorld, set in an icy 3D canyon, was developed by Professor Hunter Hoffman and Professor David Patterson at the University of Washington Harborview Burn Centre in Seattle.

It evolved out of the scientific advances in the last decade in understanding pain.

The aim of the game is “to make a very attention grabbing experience for the patient and basically to give them a place to escape from their pain” says Professor Hoffman.

Scientists have found many different elements can affect how we experience pain, including our emotions, environment, context and distractions.

“Because pain has such a strong psychological component to it, psychological treatments can be used to counteract the pain,” said Prof Hoffman.

“Because humans are so visually dominant wherever you’re looking typically that’s where your attention is focused.

Curry could be good for your liver

Researchers from the USA have claimed that Indian food could be good for your liver.  Curcumin, a chemical that gives curry its zing, holds promise in preventing or treating liver damage from an advanced form of a condition known as fatty liver disease.

Curcurmin is contained in turmeric, a plant used by the Chinese to make traditional medicines for thousands of years. SLU’s recent study highlights its potential in countering an increasingly common kind of fatty liver disease called non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).

Linked to obesity and weight gain, NASH affects 3 to 4 percent of U.S. adults and can lead to a type of liver damage called liver fibrosis and possibly cirrhosis, liver cancer and death.”My laboratory studies the molecular mechanism of liver fibrosis and is searching for natural ways to prevent and treat this liver damage,” said Anping Chen, Ph.D., corresponding author and director of research in the pathology department of Saint Louis University.

UK housing to become much more afforable for all

Panic begins to grip UK housing market as one of the largest house price inflation bubbles pops.

House prices have lost touch with the first time buyer market and are out of reach for those crucial first timers. In short, the house price to income multiple is far too high.

Indeed, the house price to income ratio is twice its long term average. For it to revert to this long term level requires either a doubling of salaries or a halving of house prices. It is not hard to see which option is the more likely in the current age of austerity.

But this is going to be a major shock to the UK national psyche. The bubble has been forming so long it has become accepted as a new reality. Few younger property owners remember the 1990-3 house price crash. Corrections can and do happen even in a market where supply is as tight as in the UK housing market.

40 a day 2 year old quits smoking

A 2-year-old Indonesian boy who attracted international attention for smoking 40 cigarettes a day has quit the habit after a month of therapy, a child-protection agency said Thursday.

Ardi Rizal started consuming cigarettes when he was 18 months old, and images of him smoking have been shown on international television.

“He has stopped smoking and doesn’t ask for cigarettes anymore,” said Arist Merdeka Sirait, chairman of theNational Commission on Child Protection.

Sirait said heavy smoking appeared to have caused brain shrinkage in the boy and could pose health risks for him at a later age.

“He needs to be in a smoking-free environment so that he doesn’t start smoking again,” he said.

The commission put the boy under its care in June after videos showing him smoking circulated on the Internet.

Check out age uk travel insurance if you need medical cover.

Nearly one-third of Indonesia’s 230 million people and more than 60 per cent of its male population smokes, according to the Demographic Institute at the University of Indonesia.

When a doggie paddle can save a life

AP – They leap from helicopters or speeding boats, bringing aid to swimmers who get into trouble off Italy’s popular beaches.

For these canine lifeguards, the doggie paddle does just fine.

Hundreds of specially trained dogs from Italy’s corps of canine lifeguards are deployed each summer to help swimmers in need of rescue.

These “lifedogs” wear a harness or tow a buoy that victims can grab, or a raft they can sit on to be towed back to shore, and unlike their human counterparts, they can easily jump from helicopters and speeding boats to reach swimmers in trouble.

With millions flocking to Italy’s crowded beaches each summer, the Italian Coast Guard says it rescues about 3,000 people every year — and their canine helpers are credited with saving several lives.

 Page 4 of 9  « First  ... « 2  3  4  5  6 » ...  Last »