| Good News Stories from around the World
Thursday October 2nd 2014

Welcome to Good News Stories

Here at Good News Stories we bring you upbeat news stories from around the World.

Supermarket giant Tescos is struggling

Tesco, who’s stores have without doubt put a lot of smaller stores out of business, has seen sales in the 13 weeks to 26 May were 1.5 per cent lower than the same period last year, although the fall was less severe than the 1.6 per cent drop for the preceding quarter.

Tescos have been trying to break into financial markets too such as travel insurance over 75 85 markets that cater for senior holidaymakers.

Tesco’s management, headed by new chief executive Phil Clarke, is struggling to re-energise the retailer, the UK’s largest, which boasts 2,800 stores across the UK, following the firm’s first profit warning in 20 years in January.

Facebook shares tumble again

SHARES of Facebook have taken another tumble, continuing a downward spiral that began at the start of the week.

The blame game has already begun with some pointing fingers at Nasdaq, where technical issues created confusion during the first day of trading, and others blaming the lead underwriter of the offering, Morgan Stanley, for failing to divulge last-minute changes to revenue projections.

After being priced at $38, the shares opened at $42.05 on Friday and fluctuated between $45 and $38 throughout the day, before closing up just 23 cents.

The California company’s shares began to tumble on Monday and closed down 11%.

Dalai Lama rocks up in Hawaii

Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama participated in a panel discussion with Native Hawaiian leaders on his second day in Hawaii at the University of Hawaii’s East-West Center and spoke about peace at a sold-out public talk on Sunday.

He has also presented in front of up to 9000 Hawaii student.

The topic of the panel discussion was “the Importance of Native Intelligence in Modern Times,” and the co-panelists were Dr. Pualani Kanahele, writer and expert on Hawaiian cultural practices and Mr. Nainoa Thompson, President of the Polynesian Voyaging Society.

It’s the Dalai Lama’s fourth visit to the islands and his first since 2008, when he went to Maui.

The Dalai Lama is next scheduled to head to San Diego as part of a North American tour.

If you head to North America for a vacation then be aware that health and medical cover can be very expensive.

Coffee giant to give a bit back

The global coffee giant Starbucks are giving a bit back to the community in terms of job creation efforts by partnering with the non-profit Opportunity Finance Network, a national network of 180 community development financial institutions (CDFIs) that orchestrate loans to businesses in low-income communities.

The Coffee shop network gave OCN $5 million at the start of the collaboration, which, when paired with the additional $1 million raised, it claims will create up to $42 million in loans to small businesses.

Starbucks has often been criticized in the past but this new scheme is hoped to raise their profile in an ethical way that will benefit many American communities hard hit by recession.

New breakthrough for Malaria treatment

There is new hope that a vaccine could be prepared in the battle against Malaria which still affects millions of people around the developing world.

Scientists now believe that they understand how the malaria parasite entersred blood cells.

The scientists, who work for the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in the UK, identified a red blood cell receptor that acts like a gateway into the cell. When they blocked the malaria protein from interacting with this receptor, the disease could not get in.

If you are visiting a country where malaria is endemic then it is very important you take out travel insurance for over 80s to ensure you are covered for any medical issues that may arise.

“By identifying a single receptor that appears to be essential for parasites to invade human red blood cells, we have also identified an obvious and very exciting focus for vaccine development,” study co-author Dr. Julian Rayner said in statement.

UK planning reforms will cut house prices and help young people

The ‘priced out’ generation will be the main benefit of planning reforms planned to come into effect in the UK. The law will be making it easier for developers to construct new homes which would increase supply and potentially drive down historically high prices.

The main group of people who are against this, driven on by a ‘vested interest’ Daily Telegraph campaign, are the older generation who have benefited from buying at a fraction of todays’ prices and the most rampant house price inflation in history. They are more concerned with conserving the value of their property and less so about the greenbelt for which they use as the main reason to prevent these reforms.

The UK chancellor said new planning laws would help younger people take a step on to the property ladder.

Young and travelling around the world? The ensure you have the best backpacker insurance in case of any medical issues.

 

Research into cancer moving forward in big leaps

From the Guardian, UK.

The head of the UK’s leading cancer charity has said understanding of the disease is advancing “exponentially”, as potentially groundbreaking trials to genetically test tumours of 9,000 newly diagnosed patients begin.

Describing a “golden era” of research, Harpal Kumar, the chief executive of Cancer Research UK, said there has been “an explosion in our understanding of what cancer is, why it happens, why it doesn’t happen in some people and why it moves around the body”.

The trials backed by the Department of Health and Cancer Research UK are being launched next month in seven hospitals across Britain. Scientists believe the results could revolutionise cancer treatments.

They will aim to find out which existing drugs the cancers are susceptible to. They will also potentially pave the way for discoveries of new medicines that are personalised or targeted to the genetic makeup of an individual’s cancer and therefore far more effective

Big supermarkets have their wrists slapped

UK supermarkets have been exposed as price fixing over a a range of dairy goods.

Asda, Sainsbury’s and Tesco were among nine supermarkets and dairy processors today fined almost £50 million for fixing cheese and milk prices over seven years ago.

According to an investigation by the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) four supermarkets, Asda, Safeway, Sainsbury’s and Tesco, indirectly co-ordinated increases in cheese and milk prices through five dairy processors, Arla, Dairy Crest, McLelland, The Cheese Company and Wiseman.

Tesco was the only retailer to not receive a reduction in its fine for agreeing to early resolution and was fined £10.43 million for colluding with companies to fix cheese prices in 2002 and 2003. Sainsbury’s was dealt the largest fine of £11.04 million for fixing both cheese and milk prices.

If you need to know the current best buy interest rates then be sure to search around the net every week.

In total eight companies were fined £49.51million, while Arla benefited from compete immunity for being the first company to alert the OFT to the anti-competitive behaviour.

Rag to close down – Good riddance

The British rag, the News of the World, which is famous for writing sensationalist rubbish for the masses, will be on Sunday producing the last edition of the ‘paper’ News International chairman James Murdoch has said.

In the past few days, claims have been made that the paper authorised hacking into the mobile phone of murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler and the families of 7/7 bombing victims.

Apparently you only need a vocabulary of around 800 words to read the paper. That says it all. Godd riddance to bad rubbish!

 

Austrian man finds treasure!

From Yahoo News:

A man turning dirt in his back yard stumbled onto buried treasure — hundreds of pieces of centuries-old jewelry and other precious objects that Austrian authorities described Friday as a fairy-tale find.

Austria’s department in charge of national antiquities said the trove consists of more than 200 rings, brooches, ornate belt buckles, gold-plated silver plates and other pieces or fragments, many encrusted with pearls, fossilized coral and other ornaments. It says the objects are about 650 years old and are being evaluated for their provenance and worth.

While not assigning a monetary value to the buried bling, the enthusiastic language from the normally staid Federal Office for Memorials reflected the significance it attached to the discovery.

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