Latest good news from the fight against cancer

The fight against cancer continues worldwide and we have selected a number of good news stories from around the world regarding the research into cures for cancer.

Our first news story comes from Australia and is about a new cancer treatment has helped nearly 80% of those in a trial of patients with leukaemia.

From Yahoo News

Lives are being saved in Melbourne in a world-first trial of a potentially revolutionary cancer drug that comes in the form of a single tablet.

Some patients with an advanced form of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), the most common type of leukaemia affecting about 1000 Australians each year, have been given a new lease on life with the invention of the new anti-cancer drug, venetoclax.

The drug has been in the works for five years.

Three Victorian centres – The Royal Melbourne Hospital, the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute – began phase-one trials of it with severely ill patients in 2011.

There are 116 patients trialling the pill, which they take daily.

Professor Andrew Roberts, a haematologist at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, says 79 per cent of participants had promising responses to the drug.

One of those is Rod Jacobs, 63, who credits it with saving his life.

He was diagnosed with CLL in 2009 and given chemotherapy, but the cancer returned in 2012.

Mr Jacobs was accepted into the trial in 2013 and today not even the most sensitive medical test can detect cancer his blood.

“The results were fantastic – my quality of life has improved immensely,” Mr Jacobs told reporters in Melbourne on Thursday.

“I wouldn’t be here today if it wasn’t for this drug.”

Professor Roberts says 20 per cent of the trial participants achieved complete remission.

“This is a very exciting result for a group of people who often had no other treatment options available,” he told reporters.

Professor John Seymour, chair of the haematology service at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, said the new drug not only worked quickly, but had significantly milder side-effects than conventional treatments.

Unlike chemotherapy patients, trial patients felt only mild nausea.

However, as these results came from the first trial involving humans, it could take years until the drug is available to the public.


From the National Student

University of Southampton researchers have developed a revolutionary new form of treatment, known as Immunotherapy, which uses a person’s internal functions to fight cancer.

Cancer Cell

The research has been conducted by specialists and has had positive test results on a number of patients being treated at Southampton General Hospital.

Early forecasts suggest that a cancer immunotherapy vaccine could be available within 15 years, developed within a new state-of-the-art facility being built in the grounds of the Tremona Road hospital.

The Southampton Centre for Cancer Immunology, which will cost £25 million to build, will attract the finest cancer research brains under one roof and transform the lives of tens of thousands of patients who will benefit from their discoveries. It will create 60 new jobs and put Southampton firmly on the world treatment stage.

Tim Elliott, professor of experimental oncology at the University of Southampton, will be the director of the new centre.

“This is the first time researchers have felt comfortable talking about a cure. The excitement comes from the fact that there are now trials of Immunotherapy” explained Elliot.

Part of the reason that cancer is so dangerous is often the lack of effective treatment. However, Southampton scientists have made what could be a potentially game-changing breakthrough in their attempts to find a cure.

After years of minimal progression in the field, Immunotherapy, which supercharges the immune system to recognise and destroy cancerous cells, could provide the answer. Additionally, the treatment may actually provide patients with long-lasting protection against future growth.

“I think we will see vaccines used in Immunotherapy in patients with all types of cancer within 15 years” said Elliot.



From CNN

Nymox Announces Prostate Cancer Clinical Trial Results From Completed 18 Month Endpoint Nymox Pharmaceutical Corporation (NASDAQ:NYMX) today announced results from the completion of the Company’s U.S. 40 month (18 month outcomes) localized prostate cancer Phase 2 NX03-0040 clinical trial of fexapotide triflutate (NX-1207). The study successfully met its pre-determined endpoints. Cancer progression clinical outcomes were significantly improved in the fexapotide treated patient groups.

The clinical trial commenced in February 2012 at 28 U.S. investigational clinical trial sites and enrolled 147 patients with low grade localized (T1c) prostate cancer. The study lasted 40 months overall from the first patient randomized to the last patient 18 month endpoints.

Results from the completed 18 month outcome study after a single injection of fexapotide included the following:

  • Absence of tumors (Primary Endpoint) controlled for size in baseline area: fexapotide 15 mg superior to control (p=.035); crossover fexapotide 15 mg superior to control (p=.002); crossover fexapotide overall superior to control (p=.014).
  • 75.5% reduction in biopsy proven prostate cancer Gleason upgrades (pathological progression) after 18 months in fexapotide 15 mg treated patients compared to control (p=.0055). 71.7% reduction in prostate cancer Gleason upgrades in fexapotide treated patients overall (p=.0045 vs controls).
  • 84.8% reduction after 18 months in surgery or radiotherapy instituted for prostate cancer Gleason upgrade (biopsy worsening) in fexapotide treated patients overall compared to control group (p=.014).
  • 54.8% reduction after 18 months in surgery or radiotherapy instituted for all causes with or without prostate cancer Gleason upgrade in fexapotide 15 mg treated patients compared to control (p=.026).
  • Significant improvement for fexapotide patients compared to controls in 4 out of 4 Secondary Endpoints. Tumor volume reduction in the treated area, combined dosages (p=.04); tumor volume change in prostate overall, fexapotide patients overall (p=.014); median tumor grade outcome in the treated area, all dosages (fexapotide median benign, vs control median Gleason 3+3), and superior median tumor grade in prostate overall, fexapotide 15 mg vs controls.
  • Consistent safety results with no significant drug-related adverse events and no significant related sexual adverse events.
  • Overall superior results for the fexapotide 15 mg dose compared to the 2.5 mg dose (dose-response).
  • Other statistically significant improvement outcomes in fexapotide patients compared to controls, to be presented comprehensively at medical meetings.

“These results demonstrate that a single targeted office injection of fexapotide has led to statistically significant improvement in outcomes with much less surgery or radiotherapy required after 18 months. This means a reduction in patient discomfort, and a reduction in permanent side effects and life changes when the more invasive treatments are required,” said Paul Averback, CEO of Nymox.

Biggest Sporting Events for Betting

Betting on sports has never been so popular. With the advent of mobile and app betting, the industry is set to grow even more!

We thought we’d look at the five most popular sports in history with the biggest ever betting spend.

sports bet

1. Football World Cup (Global)

The most popular spectator sport in the World is football, so it’s no surprise that the biggest event in the sport is also the most heavily gambled event!

The projections where for over £200 million but actually more was betted on, with numbers approaching £300 million.

The tournament is also almost one month long which helps secure it as the most betted on event. Online providers such as provide a platform to bet on such events.

2. Superbowl (USA)

The Superbowl could be argued to be the most betted on event as it is purely a one day event, in fact it’s not even a one day event, more like a few hours.

Most of the USA grinds to a halt on Superbowl day and people from all over the World will have a bet on the outcome of the finale of the NFL.

3. Cricket World Cup (Global)

OK, if you are American you might not know a whole load about Cricket. In fact the same could be said for many countries as the game is little known outside of the old ‘British Commonwealth’ world.

However sports betting is big in many of the competing countries, such as England, India, Australia/NZ and a huge amount of bets are placed.

The Cricket WC is over 6 weeks so it’s no surprise it features here!

4. Grand National (UK)

The oldest steeple chase in the World, the Grand National, takes place near Liverpool in England around late April time.

A huge amount of people will have a bet on the outcome. The volume of bets comes from the fact many people will only have a ‘flutter’ once a year on the horses, and this is the race they’ll bet on.

5. World Series Baseball (USA)

The culmination of the pro baseball leagues in the USA is the World Series, where the winner of the American leagues goes head to head with the winner of the National league.

The World Series can last over a week and outside of Superbowl, is the most popular sport in the US to have a bet on.

BBC to cut jobs with enforced cutbacks

After years of sending their staff on jollies at the expense of the British tax payer through the stealth tax that is the BBC TV Licence, finally the technological age has caught up with Auntie.

After showing complete left wing bias during the 2015 General Election the BBC is facing the fact that there is a £150m shortfall in funding and the gravy train is going to be soon hitting the buffers.

Looking for travel insurance over age of 85 then visit the various comparison sites.

Various BBC stories from around the web.


The BBC will cut over 1,000 jobs due to a £150m shortfall in its licence fee income, director Lord Tony Hall has confirmed.

With the number of households owning television sets falling as audience’s consumption practices change, the broadcaster’s income from license fee subscriptions has diminished.

The BBC said the financial challenges “means additional savings must now be found” and that it aims to save £50m from the slim down.

Hall said creating a “simpler, leaner, BBC is the right thing to do and it can also help us meet the financial challenges we face.

“We’ve already significantly cut the costs of running the BBC,” he explained, “but in times of very tough choices we need to focus on what really matters – delivering outstanding programmes and content for all our audiences.”

Professional and support areas will be most affected by the cuts, management layers will be removed and the number of its overall divisions reduced as part of Hall’s wide-ranging attempts to improve efficiency and make savings at the broadcaster.

Wage restraints, pay-off caps and a reduction in senior managers have already been implemented as part of his remodelling plan. Properties have also been vacated and sold off in order to cut costs – last month its Media Village site in White City was sold and sublet for £87m.

The £145.5 annual licence fee has been an issue of much contention in recent weeks, after culture secretary John Whittingdale called it “regressive” and argued it hit the poor the hardest.

However, Hall has said the licence hee has got “10 years life in it”.

From the Press Gazette

he BBC is to cut more than 1,000 jobs, including many managerial roles, the corporation has announced.

The cuts come as the corporation seeks to become “simpler, leaner and more effective for the future”.

They were announced by director general Tony Hall in a speech to staff this morning from the BBC’s Media Cafe. It was streamed on the corporation’s intranet.

The cuts announcement comes after reports the BBC discovered a £150m shortfall in funding from licence fee in 2016/17.

The cuts would amount to around one in 20 BBC staff going.

The BBC said it could deliver £50m in savings from “merging divisions, cutting down management layers, reducing managers and improving processes”. It said that more than 1,000 jobs would be lost as a result.

Asked where the other £100m – making up the rest of the shortfall – would come from, a BBC spokesperson said this would be announced “in due course”.

The BBC said it would reduce the number of divisions by “joining up technology teams across Digital, Engineering and Worldwide”, and said: “Further changes are also possible.”

It has also pledged to “reduce the number of layers from the top to the bottom of the organisation. In some places there are currently ten layers of people and management and this will be cut to a maximum of seven in the future.”

The statement also said that the BBC will “reduce management roles in all areas of the BBC. A simpler organisation will inevitably require fewer managers, especially at senior levels.”

And it will also bid to “simplify and standardise procedures across the BBC particularly looking at how professional and support areas such as marketing and communication, finance, HR, IT support and legal are structured and can be simplified.”

In a statement this morning, the corporation said: “Over recent years the BBC has built an impressive savings record that will deliver over £1.5bn of savings a year by 2017. Much of this has been done through cutting administration and property costs, pay and headcount restraint, plus tough decisions like more daytime repeats and shared sports rights.

“A new independent study by PwC being published today ranks the BBC amongst the most efficient organisations in the public and regulated private sectors. Overhead costs are approximately 8 per cent of total costs and will fall to 7 per cent – well below both the public sector average of 11.2 per cent and the regulated industry average of 8.8 per cent.

“Despite the progress already made, and the realities of the licence fee being frozen for seven years, a new financial challenge means additional savings must now be found.

“The licence fee income in 2016/17 is now forecast to be £150m less than it was expected to be in 2011. This is because as more people use iPlayer, mobiles and online catch-up, the number of households owning televisions is falling. It also provides further evidence of the need for the licence fee to be modernised to cover digital services.”

Director General Tony Hall said: “A simpler, leaner, BBC is the right thing to do and it can also help us meet the financial challenges we face.

“We’ve already significantly cut the costs of running the BBC, but in times of very tough choices we need to focus on what really matters – delivering outstanding programmes and content for all our audiences.”

Big UK supermarket Tescos makes a record loss

Every little doesn’t always help!

Tesco’s is the UK’s largest supermarket and is famous for squeezing farmers and food producers. It’s also famous for poor quality food and ruining small local retailers, therefore the group’s latest loss figures is very much a good news story.

Here is what some of the other media outlets are saying…

From the UK Telegraph…

Here is some of the reaction from analysts:

Clive Black, analyst at Shore Capital, said: “To say that Tesco had a nightmare year in FY2015 would be an under-statement, an out-turn that would simply have been unfathomable in days gone by. The whys and wherefores of how Tesco reached this somewhat unedifying position have been well documented to our minds, and so perhaps the key take-away for investors from CEO, Dave Lewis’, first set of preliminary results should be what of the future.”
Bruno Monteyne at Bernstein: “The press headlines will be dominated by the loss, we instead focus on the pension deficit, which has not expanded as much as some had feared, the lack of any hidden surprises and the solid trading performance coming through in the UK.”

From the UK Guardian…

The annual result was worse than the City’s most dire predictions that the group would fall £5bn into the red. Chief executive Dave Lewis said he had tried to make a break with Tesco’s recent history by accounting for all likely events.

But Lewis warned that the food retail market remained “challenging” and that, despite signs of improving sales, Tesco’s performance would be volatile for some time to come.

Lewis, who joined Tesco in September, said: “We’ve got a long, long way to go and I don’t think it will be smooth as we move through the changes we want to make. We have sought to draw a line under the past and to rebuild from here. Everything we know [about] we have dealt with.”

The former Unilever executive was drafted in to turn around the fortunes of Britain’s biggest retailer following a series of profit warnings amid a ferocious price war with rivals.

So what is the future for big supermarkets in the UK? Well other big players such as Sainsburys, Morrison and Wal Mart’s ASDA are all struggling.

Could this mean the end of the supermarket in Britain and restoring of the small independent shops.


Across Britain, the high street is in decline. The effects ripple through our communities. A major factor in this decline is the relentless rise of large supermarkets.

From Local Works – Supermarkets lead to local shops closing

Over 80% of independent shops on our high streets have closed.[1] Our local butchers, fishmongers, greengrocers and bakeries are shutting down. Meanwhile, hundreds of new supermarkets are opening, and supermarkets like Tesco and Sainsbury’s are increasing the number of local convenience stores they own.

There is a devastating lack of choice for local people buying groceries because of the rise of the supermarkets: nowadays, supermarkets control a whopping 97% of the grocery market.[2]

Supermarkets take money out of local communities

Half of the turnover of an independent local retailer goes back into the local community, while just 5% of the turnover of a supermarket does.[3] They take money out of communities and put into the hands of profit-hungry supermarket bosses.

Supermarkets lead to fewer local jobs

Every time a new supermarket opens, 276 jobs are lost locally.[4] Between 2008 and 2010, the big supermarkets Tesco, Asda and Sainsbury’s, pledged to create 67,000 new jobs. They fell far short of this target, creating just 28, 217 jobs.[5]

In 2011, supermarket giants expanded their floorspace by 2,750,000 square feet. You might expect this to lead to more jobs. The opposite happened: the total number of people employed by these companies fell by over 400.[6]

Supermarkets harm the environment

A staggering 17 billion portions of fruit and vegetables are left to rot by supermarkets, rejected because they are not considered “uniform”. To reach the standards supermarkets demand, intensive farming techniques are necessary, with a limited variety of food grown and use of chemicals to keep the fruit looking perfect.[7]

Up to 30% of the UK’s vegetable crop is never even harvested because the perfectly edible vegetables fail look how supermarkets want them to[7]. Supermarkets also demand that the food travels well, because food sold in supermarkets travels a lot further…

Most of the year, English apples are available, but only 25% of apples consumed in the UK are grown here. In fact, 90% of apples sold in our supermarkets are grown in France. The largest retailers have centralised distribution, meaning there is an enormous distance between producer, packager, distributor and ultimate retail outlet[8]. In order to supply food at short notice delivery lorries are often half-empty.[8]

Also travel insurance for the over 75 age group is also sold by most supermarkets now including Sainsburys for instance.

Supermarkets also produce vast quantities of waste that cannot be recycled. Items are overpackaged, and a total of 6.4 billion non-recyclable carrier bags were given to supermarket customers in 2010.[9]

Some of the happiest places, nations and states

There are many reports out there that list the happiest places in the World and we thought we’d list some of the most popular ones. From nations to cities and states, there are certain places in the world that just seem happier. Why is this and what makes a happy place? Well maybe our listings can throw some light on that!

cornish beach
happy beach, happy days!


What’s the secret to these happy countries – is it the location, environment, politics, culture, or just something in the water?

While we may never know the precise reasons, after compiling data from various resources like the Happy Planet Index, the World Happiness report, and Forbes’ list of happiest countries,

we can at least let you know what the 10 happiest countries in the world are.

Then, all that’s left for you to do is pack your bags, pick a country, and make your move.


Not only does Costa Rica abound with natural beauty, from the sandy beaches and ocean waters to the volcanoes and lush rainforests, but the people of this army-free country also report having one of the highest life satisfactions in the world. With a high life expectancy of 79.3 years, locals get to enjoy the pleasant living for years and years. It’s no wonder that their local saying, “pura vida”, loosely translates to “life is good”, if you have good health insurance for your trip there!


It’s not surprising that Norway tends to rank very high on world happiness reports – it’s one of the most prosperous countries in the world, has the 2nd highest level of satisfaction with standards of living, and three quarters of its residents report that they have more positive than negative experiences each day. The country is also one of the most naturally beautiful places on earth, with an abundance of fjords, glaciers, and mountains.


Switzerland is simply stunning, with its towering snow-capped mountains, beautiful lakes, and environments that range from lush to frozen. Its people are also some of the happiest, with higher than average life expectancies, strong health rankings, plenty of community involvement, and great safety. Plus, in a place that’s known for its abundance of delectable chocolate, how could you ever be sad?


According to several reports, Vietnam is the happiest country in all of Asia. Residents have a very high level of satisfaction with their life, enjoying the gorgeous beaches, green mountains, dramatic scenery, and mouthwatering regional cuisine.


Don’t let all the sharks, snakes, and venomous spiders fool you – Australians are some of the happiest in the world. Not only do they live in one of the most adored spots on earth (who wouldn’t like sunny skies, coral reefs, and white sand beaches?), but they also rank high in many life-happiness categories; they have some of the highest scores for community engagement, health, environmental care, and employment.

Other countries that could have easily made our list include New Zealand, Finland, Sweden, Austria and Germany.



Here is a list of the happiest U.S. states by most measures. It is interesting how the top two are not part of the 48!

South Dakota

Why is Hawaii so popular when it is actually quites expensive?

Living in Hawaii and Housing Cost

To rent a place in Hawaii is significantly more expensive than in most places on the U.S. mainland. A studio on Oahu, for example, costs anywhere from $700-$1,200+ per month, depending on the location. A two-bedroom apartment or a house typically starts from $1,500 per month and up. Luxurious newly-built one-bedroom condos typically rent for $2,500 and up.

When looking at the average wage people make in Hawaii, it is clear that it falls far short of the average wage required to rent a two-bedroom apartment, according to 2013 data made available by the National Low Income Housing Coalition. The Fair Market Rent for a two-bedroom apartment in Hawaii is currently $1,671. To be able to afford this rent without paying more than 30% of income on housing, a household has to earn $5,571 per month or $66,853 per year.

On the other hand Alaska seems more affordable…

The cost of living in many cities throughout Alaska is affordable and is significantly less expensive than San Francisco, Honolulu, Manhattan and a handful of other U.S. cities.

The state’s best offerings are free

And that’s not all. Places like Anchorage and Fairbanks provide all the conveniences of large cities, but without the congestion and hassles. Commutes can be shorter, so you don’t need to burn a lot of gas. There are greenbelts and parks everywhere with access to dozens of activities for families: world-class fishing, skiing, snow machining, ice skating, sledding, hiking, biking and rafting are just a stone’s throw away. And taking advantage of them doesn’t require money for a plane ticket and hotel. Open spaces are right out your front door. In other words, the best parts of Alaska are completely free!


Copenhagen, Denmark

There’s something annoyingly amazing about the Danes. Just 5.5 million people live in a country half the size of Ireland, and yet they’ve managed to create some of the best welfare models, restaurants and TV shows on earth.

Florianopolis, Brazil

Where? Don’t worry, you wouldn’t be the first to ask. But readers of ‘Conde Nast Traveller’ recently voted Florianapolis the world’s friendliest city. Happy days: Brazil is enjoying a big couple of years, hosting the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics in 2016

Melbourne, Australia

Melbourne retains the crown of “most liveable” city in The Economist Intelligence Unit’s Global Livability Report for 2014. In plain English, that puts the Australian city top of the pile when it comes to stability, healthcare, culture, environment, education and infrastructure.

Vienna, Austria

Vienna occupies the No.1 spot on the Mercer Quality of Living Survey, ranking for several years now as global consulting companies’ top city (Zurich and Auckland followed as second and third)

Vancouver, Canada

Vancouver may have more Starbucks than soul, but it’s rarely absent from lists of the world’s happiest, most livable and beautiful cities. Most recently, it finished third behind Melbourne and Vienna on The Economist Intelligence Unit’s 2014 Global Livability Report.