Fair Play to Cadbury as More Countries Go Fairtrade

cadbury-launches-fairtrade-dairy-milk-4551541Cadbury has announced that its Dairy Milk chocolate brand will be sold under the Fairtrade logo in New Zealand and Australia by next Easter.

The move follows British Cadbury’s ensuring that all Dairy Milk in Britain and Ireland is sold under the Fairtrade logo by the end of the 2009 summer, which is now in process.

The move to Fairtrade produce comes at no extra cost to the consumer, and the expansion of this policy to Australia and New Zealand means that about a quarter of Cadbury Dairy Milk global sales will be Fairtrade certified in 2010.

Cadbury’s increasing international commitment to Fairtrade, securing fair minimum prices for developing world producers on a range of products such as coffee and chocolate, transforms Fairtrade chocolate from a niche product to a mainstream staple, making the decisons landmark steps.

Europe to be powered by the Sahara?

BERLIN, (Reuters) – A 400-billion euro ($554 billion) project linking solar power produced in the Sahara to energy users in Europe and North Africa is a ‘win-win’ for both continents and could also promote integration around the Mediterranean, a German minister said.

Guenter Gloser, deputy foreign minister, told Reuters 20 gigawatts of concentrated solar power (CSP)—the equivalent of 20 large conventional power plants—could be harvested each year by 2020 if the project called Desertec got off the ground.

HIV in South Africa improving

From Associated Press….

CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) — The number of new HIV infections among South African teens has dropped significantly, prompting hope that national efforts to tackle the epidemic have finally turned a corner after years of denial and delay.

A report by the Human Sciences Research Council released Tuesday said that although young people continue to have multiple sexual partners — which drives South Africa’s epidemic — they are increasingly heeding advice to use a condom.

“There is clearly light at the end of the tunnel,” said Health Minister Dr Aaron Motsoaledi. “There is real light.”

Motsoaledi, a respected medical doctor, became health minister last month. He must overcome the legacy of former President Thabo Mbeki, who denied the link between HIV and AIDS, and his health minister Manto Tshabalala-Msimang, who mistrusted conventional anti-AIDS drugs and promoted beetroot and lemon.

Good news for a close relative

bonoboGood news for one of the lesser known great ape species! A partnership between local villages and conservation groups, headed up by the Bonobo Conservation Initiative, has led to the creation of a new 1,847 square mile (4,875 square kilometre) reserve in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

The reserve will save some of the region’s last pristine forests: ensuring the survival of the embattled bonobo—the least-known of the world’s four great ape species—and protecting a wide variety of biodiversity from the Congo peacock to the dwarf crocodile.

However, the Kokolopori Bonobo Reserve is worth attention for another reason: every step of its creation—from biological surveys to reserve management—has been run by the local Congolese NGO and villages of Kokolopori.